Japanese has two words for cold:

  • 冷たい (つめたい) / (tsumetai) - used for objects, as you’d say “this drink is cold.” I looked online because it’s hard for me to define these words, but apparently tsumetai is more to the effect of “cold to the touch.” 
  • 寒い (さむい) / (samui) - used to refer to yourself, you’d say “I’m cold.” You also use this version of cold to refer to the weather or temperature. I guess you could say this is more “feeling” wise, environmental. 
Love for the geeks who love language. Love for the geeks who love linguistics. Love for two geeks in love with either of the above in love with each other. Because of all the verbs we could have used, we picked love.

Love for the geeks who love language. Love for the geeks who love linguistics. Love for two geeks in love with either of the above in love with each other. Because of all the verbs we could have used, we picked love.

Impulsive buyer meets language geek and you get an Egyptian Hieroglyphic Dictionary.

Anonymous said: 4, 8, 10, 18

4. Favorite musician in each language I know:
English (I don’t listen to a lot of music in English so I’ll give you guys one in German)
Spanish
Portuguese 
Japanese
Mandarin (I actually think this is Taiwanese though) 
French

8. Weirdest place knowing a foreign language has been useful: On a history test when I had to answer the question of who were the first Europeans in Japan (the Portuguese). Study the language but study your world history too guys! It makes the language much more interesting, gives it a story and a context! 

10. Have I ever dreamed in a language other than my native language: Yes—since I answered this question already, I’ll tell you about a dream I had in Portuguese a while back (my old FB status): Eu tive um sonho faz 5 minutos em que uma graaande família que falava português e suas malas invadiram a minha casa. Todo mundo estava falando em português e minha irmã e eu estávamos carregando uma mala; eu disse à minha irmã, “Espera, eu quero os escutar.” (I had a dream 5 minutes ago that a big family that spoke Portuguese and their suitcases invaded my house. Everyone was speaking Portuguese and my sister and I were carrying a suitcase; I said to my sister, “Wait, I want to listen to them.”)

18. Wie geht’s?
Why is everyone wanting to know if I speak German? Should I learn? Haha :)

raincium said: Oh, language questions! :D 5, 7, and 8!

5. Favorite language-related-classroom memory: I wrote a paper in my Spanish class in college (university for those UK citizens) and when the professor was done grading them she told me (privately) that my paper was an “upper division” kind of paper (this class was taken within my first 2 years of college)—which made me so happy because I love writing so much :)

7. Hardest language I’ve ever studied: French. But I will say it’s probably due to my constant comparing it to Spanish and Portuguese…

8. Weirdest place knowing a foreign language has been useful: Knowing Japanese and having a guy in a store in Barcelona talk to me in Japanese just because I look Asian #petpeeve take note that this man was not of east Asian descent. Nonetheless you can’t imagine the look of shock on my face because I wasn’t at any point expecting to use Japanese in Catalonia. 

blanska said: 3, 10, 15

3. Favorite language to listen to: Another language I really enjoy listening to is Russian :D 

10. Have I ever dreamed in a language other than my native language: Yes—definitely in Portuguese and Mandarin. Japanese (though it could count as my native language) and maybe Spanish but I don’t have a clear memory of it…

15. Have I ever eavesdropped on people just to see if you could understand what they’re saying: I have a reduced hearing problem so half of the time even I can’t understand you if you’re directly talking to me! I’ve never eavesdropped for the purpose of seeing if I could understand, if I overhear someone it’s because I have the ability to understand in combination with the fact that I happen to hear what they’re saying by coincidence. However, I do do that thing when I eavesdrop on people to find out what language they’re speaking :P 

Anonymous said: 2?

2. Favorite language to write in: To be honest I love writing in any language. Being such a “shy” and “introverted” person I express myself better through the written word, therefore whatever language I learn I’m always eager to learn about the writing system or how I can improve it. 

That being said I enjoy writing in Portuguese because of the ease and how I’ve gotten used to the language, Mandarin for its aesthetics and feeling of gratification when looking at the completed paper. :)

abbieslanguageblog said: 3, 4 & 18??? :)

3. Favorite language to listen to: 
So hard for me to pick…I really like Brazilian Portuguese spoken or in music. I think it sounds nice and I can understand it :) 

4. Favorite musician in each language you know: 
Because this would be more fun, I’m going to link a song that I like from my favorite artist in that language :) So if I don’t have a favorite artist I’ll just link a song I really like. 
English 
Spanish
Portuguese
Japanese
French 
Mandarin 

18. Wie geht’s? 
Ich spreche kein Deutsch :( 

language questions!
1. favorite language to speak?
2. favorite language to write in?
3. favorite language to listen to?
4. favorite musician in each language you know?
5. favorite language-classroom-related memory?
6. most embarrassing slip-up?
7. hardest language you've ever studied?
8. weirdest place knowing a foreign language has been useful?
9. funniest translation error you've committed/heard?
10. have you ever dreamed in a language other than your native language?
11. favorite word in your target language(s)?
12. worst language-related classroom memory?
13. weirdest language-related classroom memory?
14. favorite resources/books?
15. have you ever eavesdropped on people just to see if you could understand what they were saying?
16. ¿qué tal?
17. ça va?
18. wie geht's?
19. come sta?
20. nasılsın?

When I think about linguistic diversity, places like China and Spain come to mind. Even places likes California in relation to modern day languages like Spanish, Mandarin, Cantonese, Tagolog, Vietnamese, and Khmer.

In my Native American pre-contact to 1830 history class, the professor talked about the linguistic diversity of North America and listed some of the linguistic groups on the board.

The languageek in me had to take a picture and share it with you guys, because all of the sudden I am inspired to learn more a out the languages that I’ve never thought about before until today.

Some notes (given to us by the professor): 

  • Pocahantas, Squanto, and Tecumseh spoke languages from the Algonquian language family.
  • Sitting Bull and Crazy Horse spoke languages from the Siouan language family.
  • Siouan and Iroquoian languages are linguistically similar. 
  • Uto-Aztecan languages are believed to have come from Mexico.